Ellen’s return no cause for celebration on ‘Battlestar Galactica’

With only four episodes left—four!—“Battlestar Galactica” continues to catapult toward its supernova finale with ample intrigue and thrills. But when it’s over, I wonder how much will seem squeezed in or slapped on because the show’s writers have a limited time frame in which to conclude this harrowing story of humanity’s survival. Tonight’s episode, while watchable enough, is an example of uneven pacing and disappointing plot development.

Since we learned last week that Ellen (Kate Vernon) was resurrected months ago, it’s no surprise when she and Boomer (Grace Park) catch up with the fleet in the first couple of minutes. However, it might have been better for both human and Cylon alike if Ellen had been lost in space for a few more months, because her conduct becomes insidious and appalling once she learns her husband, Tigh (Michael Hogan), has slept with and impregnated Caprica Six (Tricia Helfer). Visiting Caprica in the chamber she shares with Tigh, Ellen oh-so-casually drops into the stilted conversation that she had sex with him upon her arrival. Ellen’s jealousy and anger ultimately lead to a terrible tragedy that can’t be undone.

Now, I’m not entirely without sympathy. Most women would kick into cat-fight mode if they found out their husband was having a baby with someone else, but in Tigh’s defense, he, along with everyone else, believed Ellen was dead. And, even more importantly, Ellen is no ordinary woman. She’s the mother of humanity and Cylons; we expect higher ethics and morals from her. If this is the kind of behavior she exhibits when hurt, is she any better than Cavil (Dean Stockwell), whom I’d like to permanently box after discovering his role in the downfall of civilization?

Cylon Threesome?

One of the highlights of this bittersweet reunion is watching Hogan show off his character’s more tender side as he proclaims he has enough love for Ellen, Caprica Six and future baby Liam (short for William, but more on that later). Despite all his flaws, Tigh’s fierce loyalty to the people and things he cares about is nothing short of remarkable. He also seems to possess the most common sense on the fleet when he points out that humans and Cylons need each other. “Pure human doesn’t work. Pure Cylon doesn’t work. It’s too weak,” he snarls. Wow. When Tigh starts dispensing pearls of wisdom, you know you’re near the end.

My question: Why is Tigh so sought after by hot blondes? Is it the missing eye? The ease with which he says frak? Or maybe it’s his ability to frak well??? Will Katee Sackhoff’s Starbuck—whose origins remain a mystery—turn out to be a Cylon and fall for him next? Then again, if Ellen’s mockery has any basis in truth, the one Tigh really wants is his best bud, the stoic Adama (Edward James Olmos). In an intimate scene that borders on absurd—yes, I’m cynical—Adama is the one Tigh goes to with a broken heart, and the two comfort each other in a prolonged embrace with while tears stream from their eyes. (Well, in Tigh’s case, it’s just the one eye.)

Sobriety check

In one scene Adama and Tigh are throwing back drinks like they don’t have to fight for humanity’s survival the next day. In the next scene, Adama is walking around examining his ship, keeping a close eye on the repairs being made by Tyrol (Aaron Douglas) and his Cylon crew. Either some time has passed without any obvious indication to the viewer, or the tradeoff in the future is less humans in exchange for a quick recovery time after a heavy bout of drinking.

Priceless moment: The look on Roslin’s (Mary McDonnell) face when Ellen asks for a drink and the only one to accommodate her—Adama—pulls a flask out of his pants pocket. Apparently the admiral has learned to keep his friends close, his enemies closer and his liquor closest.

Boomer and Chief, sitting on a ship …

In last week’s episode, when Ellen is talking about love to Boomer and the next scene shifts to Tyrol—that’s when I began to hope that Boomer and Tyrol could finally achieve happiness together as a couple. Tonight the two are finally reunited. “Nice to see you again,” he says, before addressing the others assembled in the bay, “This is Boomer.” He and Boomer share an intense glance before she is led away to—where else?—the brig.

Obviously despite the tale of he and Tory (Rekha Sharma) being lovers in the past, Tyrol is more interested in resurrecting his love affair with Boomer. It looks like the two have a private moment on next week’s episode, but it may be cut short by the Cylon demand that this particular Eight be put on trial for treason. Of course, the almost smug smile on Boomer’s face could mean one of two things: She wants Tyrol back, or she’s a trap sent by Cavil to lure the Final Five away.

Gaius and his female flock

Am I the only one who wishes that Gaius (James Callis) was also killed when Gaeta (Alessandro Juliani) and Tom Zarek (Richard Hatch) were executed a few episodes ago? Do we really care about Gaius losing control of his worshipers? Doesn’t anyone in his cult recognize that his initial desire to feed starving children in the fleet is fueled by his desire to woo one of the children’s attractive young mothers?

For such a genius, Gaius doesn’t show much intelligence in some of his choices, yet he demonstrates he still has persuasive skills in Adama’s office when he convinced the admiral to arm his followers with the firepower needed to beat off the bullies.

Best line: “Ladies, show these men you are armed.” Gaius has no qualms admitting he is not the one with the muscle in his group.

The mourning after

“If it works, she’ll still be the Galactica on the outside, but she won’t know what she is anymore.” So says an inebriated Adama to Tigh.

We’re used to seeing a lot of Cylons on a base ship, but seeing them on Galactica, all dressed in uniform as they patch up the ship’s cracks using their technology, is disconcerting at first. It’s especially odd to see them so hard at work when you realize the Cylons have another plan: They want to band together with the Final Five and jump away. Tyrol and Tory vote to go—hardly a shock for Tory, given her conscience has been eroding ever since she discovered her true heritage. A hostile Ellen casts the sway vote to abandon ship. Anders is still unconscious, and Tigh, well, he can’t even conceive of the thought of leaving Bill or the fleet.

Still, the last scene shows promise for a more integrated future. Adama and Roslin are strolling around the ship watching the Cylons, when they witness a Six stopping at a wall covered with pictures. The pictures are of Cylons who have died since joining the fleet. Roslin looks surprised, Adama grim and thoughtful. What are pain and grief, if not the province of humanity at its most basic form?

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One Response to “Ellen’s return no cause for celebration on ‘Battlestar Galactica’”

  1. As far as we can tell, he’s been deactivated and should be harmless to you puny humans, but then again you never know with Cylons… Blanca Market

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